This Woman Thought She Had a Pimple Under Her Eye—But It Turned Out to Be Skin Cancer

It began as a tiny pimple under her eye. It never seemed to go away, and after three years, the New York City schoolteacher decided it was time to have it examined. That is when Gibson Miller, 24, discovered she had developed stage 1 basal cell carcinoma. Yes, it was skin cancer of all things.

This Woman Thought She Had a Pimple Under Her Eye—But It Turned Out to Be Skin Cancer

Many of us find a little pink blemish on our face once in a while and think nothing of it. In Miller’s case, the pimple stuck around. She noticed it in photos, but no one else observed the pearlized pimple. The Manhattan middle school teacher went about her daily lifestyle. Then one day, she decided to visit a dermatologist to have the suspicious spot checked out.

A biopsy was performed, and her specialist confirmed it. Gibson Miller had basal cell carcinoma. She underwent Mohs surgery to remove it and then had stitches on the treated site.

Miller was frightened because she didn’t know anyone else with the condition. The fair-skinned young woman had spent a lot of time outdoors, especially from age 9 through her early 20s. She was a standout tennis player and was often competing on the court for hours out in the bright sun. She admits that she began wearing sunscreen while in high school as a senior. However, she wasn’t always consistent, and when she applied the cream, she didn’t pay attention to the eye area.

Miller rubbed on sunscreen to her shoulders and face. She didn’t like wearing a visor or hat to keep the powerful UVA/UVB rays at bay.

Dermatologists recommend applying sunscreen around the delicate skin of the eyes and even on the eyelids. Dr. James Chelnis, an oculoplastic surgeon at New York Eye and Ear Infirmary of Mount Sinai, spoke with “Today.” Cialis had treated Gibson’s skin cancer. He advises that everyone apply sunscreen containing zinc oxide and titanium. Those two ingredients provide excellent physical blockage from the sun.

Unfortunately, more people are developing skin cancer at an earlier age. Young women are especially vulnerable from the ages of 18 to 39. Cancer can often begin appearing as a blemish that refuses to go away. Sometimes, these pimples get larger, start bleeding or don’t release anything when squeezed. It’s best to have a suspicious spot examined.

Gibson Miller is doing fine these days. She is cancer-free and puts on a pair of sunglasses and a hat when she is outdoors. Now, she loads up on the sunscreen and warns others to play safe. You can barely see a tiny scar where she had the suspicious pimple under her eye.

Dermatologists say that a pimple under the eye doesn’t always signify cancer. A cyst could be another reason. The best route is to visit an expert and not be embarrassed to have any spot or blemish examined.

It’s almost impossible to avoid sun exposure. Applying a protective sunscreen is the answer. Gibson Miller took the right approach in dealing with her suspicious pimple.