Home health Pain 4 Things You Do Wrong That Cause Your Chronic Back Pain and How to Fix It

4 Things You Do Wrong That Cause Your Chronic Back Pain and How to Fix It

0
4 Things You Do Wrong That Cause Your Chronic Back Pain and How to Fix It
4 Things You Do Wrong That Cause Your Chronic Back Pain and How to Fix It

4 Things You Do Wrong That Cause Your Chronic Back Pain and How to Fix It

[nextpage title=”…”]

Chronic back pain can seriously affect your life. It can impact your physical mobility, your mood, your job and your recreational time. Sometimes, the pain might be so bad that you don’t even want to get out of bed, producing aching, stabbing, throbbing sensations or a feeling of tension in the muscles. If you’re suffering from chronic back pain, it’s important for you to know that there are small, exercise related lifestyle changes that you can make in order to begin alleviating your pain. A lot of chronic back pain stems from the fact that the back is comprised of several muscle groups in addition to the spine. As we age, we’re more prone to minor injuries and strains, which makes attention to muscular and spinal health especially important. Let’s take a closer look at 4 ways you can start improving your chronic back pain today.

1.Sit Up Straight

proper-sitting-posture-neutral-pelvis

You’ve heard your mother and your teachers say it, and with good reason. Poor posture is one of the leading causes of chronic back pain. If you work in a seated position, trade your old chair out for one that offers lumbar (lower back) support or a high backed chair that supports you entirely. Belief it or not, the position of your feet in this scenario is equally important. Placing your feet flat on a small stool so that your knees are slightly higher than your hips is the most ergonomically correct position for your back and the one that will be the most helpful in eliminating back pain.

2.Stand Up Straight, Too

teressas-postures-with-line

If you’re working at a job where you’re on your feet all day, chances are good that at some point you’ll be inclined to slouch. Don’t do it. It might seem like it’s alleviating your chronic back pain, but it’s just bending your back in an unnatural way. Instead, attempt to change your standing posture. Don’t dangle your head downwards – keep it up and remain alert. Put your shoulders back slightly and pull in your stomach muscles to achieve ideal posture, which can help to reduce muscular strain. If you’re able, standing with one foot on a small stool and switching feet every 15 minutes or so can also be beneficial.

3.Don’t Ditch Exercise – Just Change Your Routine

RELATED ARTICLE: The Truth About Back Pain: 5 Critical Facts You Need To Know

back

When your back hurts, the thought of exercise might seem dreadful. After all, who wants to go work out when they’re in pain?

[/nextpage] [nextpage title=”…”]

The truth is that while a couple of days of rest and anti-inflammatory medication may assist you, getting back to the gym after that is important to your muscular health. Tension and inflammation can be eased through regular physical activity. If you’re a sedentary person avoiding workouts because of your existing pain, try to push through – with a doctor’s permission, of course. You may be surprised at just how helpful a light workout and some stretches can be in putting the kitbash on your aches and pains.

4.Sleep in the Right Position

wrong-and-right-pillows1

You may be thinking that the “right” sleeping position is the one that you fall asleep in, but being a little more deliberate about your choice of sleeping position can help you greatly in the long run. Most sleepers will find one of two three options amenable:

Rest on the side of your choice and pull your knees towards your chest a little
Rest on your back, propping up both your knees and lower back with a pillow

Resting on your stomach can actually cause back pain, but if it’s the only way you can fall asleep, elevate your hips by placing a pillow under them.

Essential Stretches For Alleviating Back Pain

Blog_020816_3

Place a yoga mat on the floor and lie on your back, completely flat, toes pointed at the ceiling. Bend your left knee slowly, pulling your leg up to your chest by wrapping your arms around the back of your thigh. Stay in that position for 20 seconds, lower the leg slowly and repeat with the alternate leg, repeating the cycle three times.

Kneel on all fours, as though you were imitating a quadrupedal animal. Your hands should rest right beneath your shoulders, and your knees should be lined up beneath your hips. As you exhale, arch your back gently, and as you inhale, tighten your back’s muscles. Alternate slowly between the two, maintaining your position for about 10 seconds and repeating the process 10 times.

[/nextpage]